Creating the Anita Borg Awards

By Kathy Richardson

Kathy Richardson

Kathy Richardson

Anita Borg was a friend, and an inspiration to women technologists and feminists working to improve women’s lives. She encouraged and challenging us to be more of both. I was instrumental in developing the Anita Borg awards to honor two of her passions.
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…Accepted Invitation to Technovation

by Anar Simpson, Global Ambassador – Technovation Challenge

Anar Simpson with the 2014 TechWomen delegation

Anar Simpson with the 2014 TechWomen delegation

Last year I shared the path that led me to Technovation. Fast forward one year – the Technovation program has doubled in size with amazing opportunities for young women around the world to work toward their vision of changing the world!
Read last year’s (2013) story here:You are Invited to…

Today I want to share the amazing projects these young women have created through the program.

The young women are encouraged to create apps that address a problem within their own community. Many of the problems are basic human struggles,such as stress, fitting in, and uncertainty.
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What’s your “super-heroine” power?

By Sabina Nawaz, CEO, Nawaz Consulting LLC

Sabina Nawaz

Sabina Nawaz

We all have amazing strengths! In what way are you truly world-class? What is your super power? How can you bring your super-power to the forefront?

I help leaders identify their powers, develop a “signature”, and enhance their unique value add to their organizations.
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Do the work AND take credit

By Shiney Rossi

Shiney is a Senior Mobile Engineer at Nest Labs. She loves simple and elegant designs and loves finding ways to make technology enjoyable and less intimidating for the everyday person.

Shiney Rossi

Shiney Rossi

For much of my career, I have always assumed that the quality of my work would speak for itself. But one experience taught me the value of appropriate self-promotion.

Several years ago, I volunteered to host a small hackathon on behalf of a female-focused developer community. I approached an executive in my company who often voiced support for getting women into STEM professions. The executive agreed to have the company sponsor the event.
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Into the Unknown

By Julia Ferraioli
Julia is a Developer Advocate working on Google Cloud Platform. She helps developers harness the power of Google’s infrastructure to develop quickly, intelligently, and at scale. She comes from an industrial background in software engineering, and an academic background in machine learning and assistive technology.

Julia Ferraioli

Julia Ferraioli

I sat in my shared office, staring blankly at the screen of my laptop. I had just made the call to leave my PhD program. It wasn’t a good fit for me: I didn’t love the coursework, I felt socially isolated, and I missed the home I had made for myself in Seattle. Leaving was the right call, but I was suddenly faced with the bleak prospect of finding a job in a depressed economy when I wasn’t even sure what I wanted to do.
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Confession: I’m a crafter

by Anne Sullivan, co-founder Play Crafts

Anne Sullivan

Anne Sullivan

It wasn’t until I was in my 30s before I admitted to another computer programmer that I was into crafting. And I only admitted it to her because she was a woman. For the previous 10+ years, I’d been too embarrassed about how obviously female it was to be into crafts. Instead I spent my free time with coworkers shooting pool, talking about cars, and playing video games. All of these things were things I enjoyed, but my interests were heavily curated to help me fit in.

In my 30s, I went back to grad school in computer science. I found a program that focused on video games and that’s where I met another crafter. She would become my best friend over our years together in grad school, and a lot of that was due to bonding over crafting. We both learned to quilt and helped start a local chapter of the Modern Quilt Guild.
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Take on New Roles at GHC

Fiona reflects on being an isolated freshman about to quit computing, her first Grace Hopper Celebration experience, and finally attending GHC as a successful young professional. Each allowed her to grow and take on new roles and gain new experience.  This is a opportunity to think about your role as a GHC attendee.

by Fiona Tay

Fiona Tay

Fiona Tay

I’d like to share an excerpt of an essay I wrote in freshman year:


I was nearly in tears. It was just after 7.00 pm, on the first Thursday after winter break, and I was sitting in the college computer lab, staring at the computer monitor and on the verge of breaking down. I wasn’t beaten down by relationship issues or homesickness, but because of our Scheme homework assignment. No matter what I tried, the dreaded words ‘SYNTAX ERROR’ kept popping up. The compiler simply refused to run my program.
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Acting on GHC Inspiration

There is so much to take away from the Grace Hopper Celebration.  Kathy talks about leveraging a couple of the big ideas she gained from the first GHC to make a big impact on her life.


By Kathy Richardson

Kathy Richardson

Kathy Richardson

Before the first Grace Hopper Celebration, women rarely had the opportunity to be both computer scientists and women at the same time.

On my own I wouldn’t have gone to the first Grace Hopper Celebration (GHC). Like most techie women in 1994 I was afraid to ask for sponsorship to a “women’s conference”. But Anita Borg was my industry advisor, and I couldn’t possibly let her down. So I put on my brave face, had an awkward conversation with my thesis professor, applied for a scholarship, convinced my friend at Oracle to do the same… I got a ticket, registration, and a room to share! I attended that very first GHC, and it changed my life.
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