Getting Women Hooked into Open Source

By Lukas Blakk

Lukas Blakk

Lukas Blakk

I’m a late-arrival to the booming tech scene in the Bay Area. Due to many reasons including being raised by a working-poor single mother, leaving home early, finishing high school while collecting welfare, and then having no knowledge of Canada’s student loan program culminated in not following a direct route to higher education.

I was always interested in computers and jumped on them whenever there was a chance. In grade 6 we would be bussed once a week to a nearby high school that had a computer lab with Icon computers and I have journal entires from that time – written to my teacher – where I beg her to let me switch lab partners because “Roxanne and I fight over the mouse, we’re both too good with the computer”. I find it hilarious that my proposed solution was to get partnered with someone who was less skilled so I could grab more time on the controls. This is very much the opposite of what I try to do now.
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Strive for what you want

by Malavika Lakireddy

Malavika Lakireddy

Malavika Lakireddy

It seems like a lifetime ago when I, as a teenager, was deciding what major to take in my undergrad. Torn between my love for physics and my interest in computers, I chose Electronics thinking that I would build the next super computer. While I haven’t quite built a super computer, my journey nevertheless has been very interesting – I have worn many hats -as a programmer, project manager, marketer, product manager, business manager in Fortune 500 companies with hundreds of thousands of employees to startups with 10s of employees. My journey is far from complete – yet, when I look back over the last 12 years, l have lived and experienced beyond the wildest dreams of that teenager deciding what major to take. I’d like to share a couple of experiences that were really important to moving me along in my path wherein I learnt some techniques which I continue to use.
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Escape Velocity

by Sarah J Bell

Sarah Bell

Sarah Bell

This is not a story about inspiring young women to enter computer science. This is not advice for how to advance your career. This is not even a story about how I built a really cool piece of technology. This is simply the story of the most learning-intensive year of my adult life.

I left Silicon Valley two years ago. For anyone seeking to build the best technology that affects the greatest number of people, this is a bad idea. Silicon Valley is for tech what Florence was for the Renaissance. You want to write the world’s best code? Surround yourself with the world’s best engineers, live where they live, eat what they eat, play what they play.
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Develop Your Voice

by Chiu-Ki Chan

Chiu-Ki Chan

Chiu-Ki Chan

When I first started working, I was happily learning all kinds of new stuff: source control, working in a team, unit testing, etc, etc. After two years or so, I felt quite comfortable as a software engineer, and decided it was time to step up my career.

No clear path

All through my life my path had been fairly clear: study hard to get admitted to good schools, get good grades to get job offers from good companies. Unfortunately “study hard” does not translate well in the work place. To get my degree, I complete the set of courses designated by the department. But in the work place there is no more syllabus, no clear steps to advance to the next level.

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